Des Moines entrepreneurs examine Juneteenth’s impact on black-owned businesses

0


People across the country have watched Juneteenth in their own way. Some have started throwing celebrations, others have sought to further promote social justice, and then some people have stopped to take a look at what the new federal holiday means to them as business owners. “It’s a time of learning and it’s a time of respect for those who made a path,” said Nancy Mwirotsi, a serial entrepreneur in Des Moines known for founding PI 515, an after-school program for children. children who introduce them to STEM and technology. Mwirotsi not only looks back on her accomplishments, but also the accomplishments she has seen throughout Des Moines when it comes to black entrepreneurs. More recently, Mwirotsi hosted an Entrepreneurs Summit for Girls and is already seeing rapid results. “We actually have a daughter who is filing a patent and we have two daughters who have already started their business online,” Mwirotsi said. Mwirotsi moved to the Iowa capital 20 years ago and still has vivid memories of what she looked like then. This is part of the reason she works so hard to encourage younger generations to aspire to become entrepreneurs. “I remember when we only had one African business,” Mwirotsi recalls. “Now if you continue on MLK, Hickman – I would say we have over 30 African companies in the Des Moines metro.” Gursha Ethiopian Grill on University Avenue in the Drake district is one such company. Owner Salah Salah is the co-owner of the family business which opened in July. “Twenty years ago my father opened a business,” recalls Salah. “It was not as easy as it is today.” Looking at him now as a business owner himself, Salah says it’s clear times have changed. Gursha Ethiopian Grill receives support from a community that may not have been seen years ago. “I was shocked that they knew Ethiopia. Salah was shocked but is also very grateful for the ever-constant support he has seen in the last six months since opening. Despite the opening during the pandemic, Salah and his family have seen nothing but success. It’s the kind of success, but he and Nancy Mwirotsi looked back and shared with KCCI this June 10th. “Yes, we’ve been through the struggle,” Mwirotsi said. “But guess what? There is always a light at the end of the tunnel. How to get there ? We have to get there together.

People across the country have watched Juneteenth in their own way. Some have started throwing celebrations, others have sought to further promote social justice, and then some people have stopped to take a look at what the new federal holiday means to them as business owners.

“It’s a time of learning and it’s a time of respect for those who made a path,” said Nancy Mwirotsi, a serial entrepreneur in Des Moines known for founding PI 515, an after-school program for children. children who introduce them to STEM and technology.

On Saturday, Mwirotsi looked back not only on her accomplishments, but also on the accomplishments she has seen in Des Moines when it comes to black entrepreneurs. More recently, Mwirotsi hosted an Entrepreneurs Summit for Girls and is already seeing rapid results.

“We actually have a daughter who is filing a patent and we have two daughters who have already started their business online,” Mwirotsi said.

Mwirotsi moved to the Iowa capital 20 years ago and still has vivid memories of what she looked like then. This is part of the reason she works so hard to encourage younger generations to aspire to become entrepreneurs.

“I remember when we only had one African business,” Mwirotsi recalls. “Now if you continue on MLK, Hickman – I would say we have over 30 African companies in the Des Moines metro.”

Gursha Ethiopian Grill on University Avenue in the Drake district is one such company.

Owner Salah Salah is the co-owner of the family business which opened in July.

“Twenty years ago my father opened a business,” recalls Salah. “It was not as easy as it is today.”

Looking at him now as a business owner himself, Salah says it’s clear times have changed. Gursha Ethiopian Grill receives support from a community that may not have been seen years ago.

“It was more Americans,” Salah said, thinking how well received the news of the grill opening had been. “I was shocked that they knew Ethiopia.

Salah was shocked but is also very grateful for the ever-constant support he has seen in the last six months since opening.

Despite the opening during the pandemic, Salah and his family have seen nothing but success. It’s the kind of success, but he and Nancy Mwirotsi looked back and shared with KCCI this June 10th.

“Yes, we’ve been through the struggle,” Mwirotsi said. “But guess what? There is always a light at the end of the tunnel. How to get there ? We have to get there together.


Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.